U.S. National Kubb Championship

 

HISTORY

Since day one, we have wanted to create a kubb tournament where all levels of play are welcome, and everyone can have an enjoyable day. This is our story...

Eric and Erin Anderson moved to Eau Claire, WI in January 2007. Their idea of a kubb tournament started in the late Winter of 2007. The desire was to host a kubb tournament while at the same time to raise awareness and money to battle the atrocities happening in Darfur, Sudan. During the spring and summer, the tournament was promoted locally by going to the farmers' market and just about anywhere people were. A total of 35 players on 15 teams showed up that day at a small park on the corner of 1st and Grand. Players came from Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois, Michigan, and California. Some were friends. Some were family. All the rest quickly became friends and part of a large kubb family. 

In 2008, the tournament became the U.S. Midwest Championship. The tournament doubled in size and moved to Forest St. Park in downtown Eau Claire. 31 teams, 76 players, and teams came from five different states. There was discussion after the tournament to call the tournament the U.S. Championship, as this was easily the largest organized tournament in the U.S. We waited one more year. Our relationship with Girls On The Run of EC County started in 2008, as we raised money for them and again for aid organizations for Darfur. To date, GOTR operates our concession stands. 

The 2009 tournament moved yet again, as we were too large for Forest St. Park. The Championship moved to Boyd Park in the East Side Hill neighborhood. That year, 48 teams played in the tournament. The 115 players came from six different states. This was the first year that every pitch had the same type of set. At the 2009 Championship, we knew we could call the Eau Claire tournament the U.S. National Kubb Championship. In 2009, we realized that the future of kubb in Eau Claire was to get as many kids as possible playing the sport. We then went on a mission to reach as many kids as we could.

In 2010, the U.S. Championship reached 64 teams. Looking back, we could have never imagined that three years before, we were playing on a small, slanted park with different types of sets. Boyd Park was full of people. 140 players came from eight different states. People stopped all day along the bike path, with the flowing Eau Claire River in the background.

Due to ground conditions and size of the playing area, the Championship had to move again. In the Fall 2010, we officially moved to the Eau Claire Soccer Park, where we could play on a soccer field. The tournament grew by 20 teams from 2010 to 2011, as 84 teams and 180 players came to the Eau Claire Soccer Park to play in the 2011 U.S. Championship. In 2011, we introduced the five-year button. All players who have played five years get a button.

In 2012, the U.S. Championship became a registered non-profit organization and funded a scholarship at UW-Eau Claire for a student that studied in Sweden. The Championship added a second day and started requiring that no player may throw more than two batons, so at least three persons on a team. In addition, we added a trophy for the best tosser of the kubbs (bästa inkastare). Last but not least, we also introduced
The Stapp King. At the 2012 Championship, there were 76 teams made up of 262 players, which was over a 40 percent increase in the number of players from 2011. In the Fall of 2012, the Championship started the Steve Anderson Kubb Set Program, which provides free kubb sets to introduce and promote the game to new communities and population groups.

In 2013, we hosted 88 teams and 310 players.
In 2014, we introduced the Pre-Championship Tournament and Kid Kubb. In 2015, the Championship had 108 teams and Kid Kubb doubled in size. In 2016, the Championship had 128 teams and Kid Kubb had 24 teams.

The U.S. Championship's goal will always be to create an environment where we crown the U.S. National Champion, but at the same time have an atmosphere where both recreational and more serious kubb players can enjoy playing kubb all day. The U.S. National Kubb Championship is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization.


All are welcome.

  

 

2007-2011 video history 

 

Volume One's article about kubb in Eau Claire.
(2010)

 

Volume One's 10-year anniversary issue highlighting kubb.
(2012) 

 Eau Claire, WI                              U.S. National Kubb Championship                             usakubb.org